Equinox Medical NPWT Buy Back Program

Equinox Medical, LLC Buy Back Program is easy that will allow you upgrade your negative pressure wound therapy pump systems. You can now turn in your old Devon, Pensar, Genadyne, and Talley Venturi negative pressure wound therapy pumps (NPWT) and get a $500.00 credit for your next Halo MINI or Halo XT NPWT pump systems.

How does it work?

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Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Pump Rental Fee Will Drop 23% In 2016 for DME Providers

INITIAL PHASE IN OF ADJUSTMENTS TO FEE SCHEDULE AMOUNTS FOR CERTAIN

Date
2015-11-23
Title
INITIAL PHASE IN OF ADJUSTMENTS TO FEE SCHEDULE AMOUNTS FOR CERTAIN
Contact
go.cms.gov/media

Updated December 8, 2015

INITIAL PHASE IN OF ADJUSTMENTS TO FEE SCHEDULE AMOUNTS FOR CERTAIN DMEPOS USING INFORMATION FROM THE COMPETITIVE BIDDING PROGRAM

On November 23, 2015, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced the release of the 2016 Medicare Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and Supplies (DMEPOS) fee schedule amounts.  The DMEPOS and Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (PEN) public use files contain the 2016 fee schedule amounts for certain items that were adjusted based on information from the DMEPOS Competitive Bidding Program in accordance with sections 1834(a)(1)(F) and 1842(s)(3)(B) of the Social Security Act.  The following is information associated with this change.

DMEPOS Competitive Bidding Program

Section 302 of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) established requirements for a new competitive bidding program for certain DMEPOS items and services.  The statute requires that “single payment amounts” replace the current Medicare DMEPOS fee schedule payment amounts for selected DMEPOS items in certain areas of the country. The single payment amounts are determined by using bids submitted by DMEPOS suppliers.  The program is intended to set more appropriate DMEPOS payment amounts, which will reduce beneficiary out-of-pocket expenses and save the Medicare program money while ensuring beneficiary access to quality items and services.

There are currently competitive bidding programs in 99 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) throughout the United States, including Honolulu, Hawaii.  DMEPOS items and services that have been phased in under the programs thus far include:

  • Oxygen and oxygen equipment
  • Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices, single and bi-level
  • Standard manual and power wheelchairs, scooters, and walkers
  • Group 2 complex rehabilitative power wheelchairs
  • Hospital beds, commode chairs, patient lifts, and seat lifts
  • Support surfaces or pressure reducing mattresses and overlays
  • Enteral nutrients, supplies, and equipment
  • Negative pressure wound therapy pumps
  • Infusion pumps
  • Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) devices
  • Standard nebulizers

In addition, a national mail order program has been implemented for replacement of diabetic testing supplies such as test strips and lancets used with home blood glucose monitors.  The single payment amounts established under this program are also used to set the fee schedule amounts for these diabetic testing supplies when they are picked up at local pharmacies.

  • For information on DMEPOS Competitive Bidding

http://www.cms.gov/DMEPOSCompetitiveBid/

Payment for DMEPOS in Other Parts of the Country

Section 1834(a)(1)(F)(ii) of the Social Security Act requires use of information on the payment determined under the competitive bidding programs to adjust the fee schedule amounts that would otherwise be used in making payment for DME furnished outside of the competitive bidding areas (CBAs) for these items.  These adjustments must be made by no later than January 1, 2016.  This requirement provides savings for the program and all beneficiaries without having to establish competitive bidding programs throughout the entire United States.  Similarly, section 1842(s)(3)(B) of the Social Security Act provides discretion to use information on the payment determined under the competitive bidding programs to adjust the fee schedule amounts that would otherwise be used in making payment for enteral nutrients, supplies, and equipment furnished outside of the competitive bidding areas (CBAs) for these items.

Phase in of DMEPOS Fee Schedule Adjustments – The adjustments to the DMEPOS fee schedule rates will be phased in so that, during the initial 6 months of 2016, the fee schedule amounts in all areas will be based on a 50/50 blend of current rates and adjusted rates.  This will allow a 6-month transition period where health outcomes and access to these items and services can be closely monitored.

The general methodologies for adjusting the fee schedule amounts are described below and discussed in more detail in the final rule (CMS-1641-F):

1. Adjusted Fee Schedule Amounts for Areas within the Contiguous United States
For most DMEPOS items furnished in the contiguous United States, the adjustments to the fee schedule amounts will be made in different regions of the country based on information from competitive bidding programs conducted in each region.  The amount of variation in the regionally adjusted rates will be limited by a national ceiling equal to 110 percent of the average of the regionally adjusted rates, and a national floor equal to 90 percent of the average of the regionally adjusted rates.

Based on concerns raised by the public regarding the possible impact on access to DMEPOS items and services in rural areas of the country, the following rule was established:

Special Rule for Rural Areas – For an item or service included in 10 or more competitive bidding programs, a special rule was established for adjusting fee schedule amounts used in making payment for the item or service in areas within the contiguous United States that are defined as “rural” areas.  For the purpose of implementing this rule, a rural area is defined as a geographic area represented by a postal zip code if at least 50 percent of the total area included in the zip code is outside any MSA.  In addition, a rural area includes a geographic area represented by a postal zip code that is a low population density area excluded from a competitive bidding area.  For example, using authority in the statute, low population density areas in much of the eastern section of the Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario MSA in California, were excluded from the CBA established for that MSA, and these areas are defined as rural areas for the purpose of implementing this rule.

For these areas, in no case will a fee schedule amount for any DMEPOS item furnished in the area be reduced below the national ceiling amount mentioned above.  For example, the regionally adjusted rate for January 2016 for oxygen and oxygen equipment for the region that includes the states of California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington, is limited by the national floor amount mentioned above.  For all areas in these states that meet the definition of a rural area, the adjusted fee schedule amount for oxygen and oxygen equipment furnished in these areas will be set based on the national ceiling amount rather than the national floor amount, which is a 20 percent difference.

As noted above, the fee schedule amounts from January thru June of 2016 will be based on a 50/50 blend of current rates and adjusted rates, so the maximum difference between the fees for urban areas versus rural areas will not be realized until July 2016.

2. Adjusted Fee Schedule Amounts for Areas outside the Contiguous United States
Fee schedule amounts for areas outside the contiguous United States (i.e., noncontiguous areas such as Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico) are adjusted so that they are equal to the higher of the average of the (single payment) competitive bidding payment amounts for CBAs in areas outside the contiguous United States (currently only applicable Honolulu, Hawaii) or the national ceiling amount.
3. Adjusted Fee Schedule Amounts for Items Included in 10 or Fewer Areas 
Fee schedule amounts for DMEPOS items included in 10 or fewer CBAs are adjusted so that they are equal to 110 percent of the average of the competitive bidding payment amounts established for each of the areas. The average of the competitive bidding payment amounts will be a straight average and will not be weighted (e.g., based on the volume of items furnished in each of the competitive bidding areas). Items subject to this methodology as of January 2016, include commode chairs, nebulizers, infusion pumps, patient lifts, seat lifts, TENS devices, Group 2 complex rehabilitative power wheelchairs, and certain wheelchair accessories.  For these items, this methodology applies to all areas (i.e., non-contiguous and contiguous).
Examples of New Payment Rates for January

The table below lists average 2015 fees and average 2016 blended fees for the contiguous United States (both for urban areas and rural areas) for select items with the percentage change from 2015 to 2016:

Selected DMEPOS Items: Fees and Percentage Change from 2015 to 2016

DMEPOS Item HCPCS¹ 2015 Fee

2016 Blended Urban Fee

% change urban

2016 Blended Rural Fee

% change rural

Oxygen Concentrator (monthly) E1390

$180.92

$137.04

-24%

$141.74

-22%

CPAP (rental) E0601

$102.35

$74.55

-27%

$76.91

-25%

Hospital Bed (rental) E0260

$134.38

$102.53

-24%

$106.09

-21%

NPWT Pump (rental) E2402

$1,642.09

$1,219.48

-26%

$1,259.39

-23%

Manual Wheelchair (rental) K0001

$57.06

$41.69

-27%

$43.02

-25%

Power Wheelchair (rental) K0823

$577.42

$430.87

-25%

$445.20

-23%

Walker (purchase) E0143

$110.92

$82.14

-26%

$84.83

-24%

Commode Chair (purchase)² E0163

$119.05

$93.42

-22%

n/a

n/a

TENS (purchase)² E0730

$402.70

$290.40

-28%

n/a

n/a

Nebulizer (rental)² E0570

$17.86

$14.48

-19%

n/a

n/a

Powered Mattress (rental) E0277

$662.42

$451.74

-32%

$463.70

-30%

Insulin Pump (rental)² E0784

$465.19

$439.91

-5%

n/a

n/a

Enteral Pump (rental) B9002

$121.70

$93.15

-23%

$96.41

-21%

Enteral Supplies (daily) B4035

$11.95

$8.93

-25%

$9.23

-23%

Enteral Nutrients (per 100 calories) B4150-B4154

$1.12

$0.90

-20%

$0.93

-17%

¹ HCPCS = Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System; codes used to identify items for billing purposes

² Item included in 10 or fewer CBAs

The table below lists average 2015 fees and average 2016 blended fees for Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands for select items with the percentage change from 2015 to 2016:

DMEPOS Item HCPCS 2015 Fee

2016 Blended Fee

% change

Oxygen Concentrator (monthly) E1390

$180.92

$145.61

-20%

CPAP (rental) E0601

$107.41

$80.75

-25%

Hospital Bed (rental) E0260

$134.38

$110.38

-18%

NPWT Pump (rental) E2402

$1,724.18

$1,331.09

-23%

Manual Wheelchair (rental) K0001

$58.64

$48.08

-18%

Power Wheelchair (rental) K0823

$591.86

$451.21

-24%

Walker (purchase) E0143

$121.13

$92.82

-23%

Commode Chair (purchase) E0163

$136.55

$103.12

-24%

TENS (purchase) E0730

$439.89

$310.43

-29%

Nebulizer (rental) E0570

$17.72

$14.41

-19%

Powered Mattress (rental) E0277

$673.00

$495.15

-26%

Insulin Pump (rental) E0784

$486.60

$451.44

-7%

Enteral Pump (rental) B9002

$121.70

$96.11

-21%

Enteral Supplies (daily) B4035

$11.95

$9.24

-23%

Enteral Nutrients (per 100 calories) B4150-B4154

$1.12

$0.93

-17%

Below are examples of average savings based on payments using the blended rates for the first 6 months of 2016 for three commonly used rental items: an oxygen concentrator (E1390), a hospital bed (E0260), and a powered pressure-reducing air mattress (E0277).

Oxygen concentrator payments for 6 months

Under the current fee schedule, the supplier is paid $1,086, on average, for furnishing an oxygen concentrator for 6 months, of which the beneficiary pays $217 in coinsurance payments. Beginning January 1, 2016, the supplier will be paid $822 for furnishing the concentrator in urban areas under the fee schedule and $850 for furnishing the concentrator in rural areas under the fee schedule. The beneficiary’s coinsurance will drop from $217 to $164 in the urban areas and from $217 to $170 in the rural areas.

Hospital bed payments for 6 months

Under the current fee schedule, the supplier is paid $705, on average, for furnishing a hospital bed for 6 months, of which the beneficiary pays $141 in coinsurance payments. Beginning January 1, 2016, the supplier will be paid $538 for furnishing the bed in urban areas under the fee schedule and $557 for furnishing the bed in rural areas under the fee schedule. The beneficiary’s coinsurance will drop from $141 to $108 in the urban areas and from $141 to $111 in the rural areas.

Powered mattress payments for6 months

Under the current fee schedule, the supplier is paid $3,478, on average, for furnishing a powered mattress for 6 months, of which the beneficiary pays $696 in coinsurance payments. Beginning January 1, 2016, the supplier will be paid $2,372 for furnishing the mattress and pump in urban areas under the fee schedule and $2,434 for furnishing the mattress and pump in rural areas under the fee schedule. The beneficiary’s coinsurance will drop from $696 to $474 in the urban areas and from $696 to $487 in the rural areas.

Monitoring the Impact of the Adjustments to the Fee Schedule Amounts

Currently, a very sophisticated, real-time claims and health outcomes monitoring program is used to ensure that access to necessary items and services is not negatively affected by the competitive bidding programs.  This program will be used to ensure that access to necessary DMEPOS items and services in non-CBAs of the country is not negatively affected by the initial blended rates during the 6-monthphase-in period.  This program will also continue to monitor to ensure that access is preserved after the phase-in period, when the full adjustments take place.

  • For information on the Competitive Bidding data monitoring program

https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Medicare-Fee-for-Service-Payment/DMEPOSCompetitiveBid/Monitoring.html

Click here to order your free Silver Carbon Wound Dressing

Click here to order your free Silver Carbon Wound Dressing

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Wound Closure and Advanced Wound Care Global Market – Forecast To 2021

 Wound Closure and Advanced Wound Care Global Market – Forecast To 2021

Wound closure and wound care devices are the medical apparatus used for the closure of the wound by pulling the cut edges of the tissues together or by directly acting on the wounds for better healing. Devices such as sutures, strips, sealants and adhesives, clips, staples, energy based devices, haemostats and skin grafts are used to minimize the trauma and infection leading to a better and a scar-free healing. The wound closure and advanced wound care global market is segmented based on the products, applications, end-users and geography. Products are divided into primary and secondary wound closure products. Primary wound closure devices include surgical sutures, wound closure strips, staples, ligating clips, haemostat, adhesives and sealants. Surgical suture market is segmented into suture and automated suturing device. Suture market is further divided based on types, filaments, and material type. Sealants are divided into natural and synthetic sealant. Natural sealants are collagen, fibrin and albumin. Synthetic sealants are divided into cyanoacrylate, polymer and others. Haemostats are divided into flowable haemostats, fibrin sealants, mechanical haemostats and active haemostats.

Secondary wound closure devices include energy based devices, therapy based devices, moist wound therapy and biologics. Energy based devices are divided into laser devices, electrical stimulations, electromagnetic stimulations, ultra sound therapy, radio frequency therapy and ultra violet therapy. Therapy based devices are further segmented into hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy and pressure relief devices. Biologics are divided into skin grafts and growth factor. Moist wound therapy is segmented into film, foam, hydrocolloids, hydrogels, alginate and collagen dressings.

By application, the wound closure and advanced wound care markets are divided into burns, ulcers, surgical wounds, trauma and laceration and radionecrosis. Ulcers are further divided into pressure ulcers, arterial ulcers, venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers. Surgical wound are divided into general surgery, cardio vascular surgery, neuro and spine surgery, ENT surgery, orthopaedic surgery, urology surgery, oncology surgery, obstetrics and gynaecology surgery and plastics, cosmetics and reconstruction surgery. Based on the end- users they are segmented into hospitals, community healthcare services and home healthcare.

Among the wound closure and advanced wound care products, the primary wound closure market dominated the products market by occupying a largest share. At the same time, secondary wound closure market is the fastest growing segment from 2014 to 2021. In applications, the surgical wounds are the largest segment with XX% share and ulcers are the fastest growing segment with single high digit CAGR from 2014 to 2021.

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By end- users, hospitals is the largest segment with a share of XX% and also, the fastest segment with a CAGR of 7.4% from 2014 to 2021.Geographical wise, North America is the largest market, followed by Europe and Asia. The APAC region is the fastest growing region with single high digit CAGR from 2014 to 2021 suggesting an array of opportunities for growth and likely to be getting into the eyes of new investors in the wound closure and advanced wound care market. Growth in the Asian market is attributed to rising prevalence of lifestyle diseases and government initiatives in establishing innovative technologies and demand for sophisticated medical services.

The wound closure and advanced wound care market is expected to grow steadily CAGR during 2014 to 2021. The factors driving the growth of this market are rising prevalence of lifestyle diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular and related surgeries drive the demand for sophisticated tissue sealing alternatives, new technology products boosting wound closure and advanced wound care products market growth, increase in aging population, increase in volume of surgeries, government initiatives and wide range of available products likely to propel the wound care market. In addition to this, increasing prevalence of chronic wounds, optimised therapy based devices, healthy growth in the biological products and acquisitions to open an array of opportunities for the market to flourish are some of the opportunities that are propelling the growth of the market. However, lack of trained physicians restraining market growth of advanced wound closure and care products, high cost of sealants and glues impeding effective penetration in low- and middle-income countries, unfavourable reimbursement policies and reluctance in adoption of new technologies are hampering the growth of the market. The threats for the wound closure and advanced wound care market include survival of small players & new entrants and decreasing R&D funding will impact on innovation.

The wound closure and advanced wound care global market is a highly competitive market and all the existing players in this market are involved in developing new and advanced products to maintain their market shares. Some of the key players of the wound closure and advanced wound care market are Smith & Nephew (U.K.), Johnson and Johnson (U.S), Medtronic (Ireland), 3M healthcare (U.S), Kinetic Concepts (U.S.), Coloplast (Denmark), Abbott laboratories (U.S.), C.R.Bard (U.S.), Baxter International (U.S.),Cardinal Health (U.S.), Integra life science (U.S.) and B. Braun Melsungen AG (Germany).

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Kocarbon Ag Silver Carbon Wound Dressing Case Study – Healed Left Lateral Foot Ulcer Video

Dr. Ming-Wei Wu, D.O., Board Certified General and Wound Surgeon

Patient Background

69M c respiratory failure, L LE peripheral artery disease, thyroid disease, COPD, dysphagia developed sudden onset of L lateral foot wound. 

Treatment

Debridement was performed and KoCarbon Ag treatment was iniated. 6 weeks after treatment, Kocarbon Ag was change to hydrocolloid treatment.

Result

4 weeks after KoCarbon Ag treatment, the wound was significantly reduced in size. At 6th week treated with KoCarbon Ag Silver Carbon Wound Dressing, the wound was largely improved

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Silver Carbon Wound Dressing Launched into $15 Billion Global Market

Silver Carbon Wound Dressing Launched into $15 Billion Global Market

British specialist technology company, Advanced Medical Solutions (AMS), which supplies the $15 billion global wound care market with advanced wound care dressings and tissue adhesives for wound closure has announced a new silver-containing dressing. This has already been launched in the U.S. and is being introduced into the European and other international markets this month.

Systagenix Wound Management, the marketing and distribution partner for AMS’ fiber-based silver alginate technology, has expanded its existing anti-microbial wound dressings offering with the introduction of AMS’s SILVERCEL Non-Adherent Hydro-Alginate Dressing.

The company notes that silver is widely recognized as a safe and effective broad-spectrum anti-microbial agent for infection control.

In 2003, AMS developed a range of wound dressings whereby silver fibers were incorporated into its proprietary calcium alginate technology, which allows a controlled and sustained release of silver into the wound without compromising the performance of the base alginate—a natural wound dressing derived from seaweed. The global silver alginate market is currently estimated at around $350 million and growing at 15% per annum.

The new wound dressing should have application in the military market as well as for accident applications and demonstrates the growing usage for silver in medical applications. Such medical usage is one of the growing new markets for silver, and while it may take a long time to replace the losses from the switchover to digital from film in the photographic sector, it is becoming a significant market for the sector.

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KoCarbon Ag Silver Carbon Wound Dressing Case Study Video by Equinox Medical

KoCarbon Ag Silver Carbon Wound Dressing Case Study Video by Joey Mallari

Dr. Ming-Wei Wu, D.O., Board Certified General and Wound Surgeon
Patient Background

65M c respiratory failure, dysphagia, CVA/intracranial hemorrhage, vegetative state, paraplegia, nonverbal, DM II, had sudden development of L lateral malleolus pressure ulcer.

Treatment
Debridement was performed and KoCarbonAg® silver carbon wound dressing treatment was initiated.
4 weeks after treatment, KoCarbonAg® was change to hydrocolloid treatment.

Result
Two weeks after KoCarbonAg treatment, the wound was clean and in proliferation phase.
At fourth week treated by KoCarbonAg, the wound was epithelialized mostly.

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KCI Purchased another Portable NPWT pump competitor

KCI purchased SNAP NPWT Portable NPWT Pump Company

Acelity, a San Antonio-based global company focused on wound care and regenerative medicine, has acquired the SNaP Therapy System, a line of disposable negative pressure wound therapy products, from Spiracur.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Spiracur is a privately held medical device company based in Sunnyvale, California. Its SNaP Therapy System is designed to treat a range of complex and hard-to-heal wounds with portable, non-powered negative pressure technology, primarily in the post-acute setting.

Boston Scientific device recalled after patient dies

Boston Scientific device recalled after patient dies

The US Food and Drug Administration issued another warning Friday about failures in artery-clearing tools made by Boston Scientific Corp. that resulted in one patient dying.

A patient died in September, four days after a wire piece broke off one of the components and perforated a vessel, according to an FDA report. Two other patients were also injured when the parts broke during operations.

Boston Scientific, based in Marlborough, had issued an “urgent medical device recall” on Oct. 9 for guide wires used in its “Rotablator” system, and the FDA earlier in November also published a recall notice.

The alert Friday said, “The use of affected product may cause serious adverse health consequences, including death.”

Boston Scientific spokesman Tom Keppeler said the company had voluntarily recalled the devices “due to the possibility of wire fracture.” He said the devices were in “limited distribution, and we have contacted all of the affected hospitals accordingly.”

In the other cases where the devices broke, also in September, doctors had to take urgent measures, including emergency surgery, to try to retrieve the wire pieces. In one instance, physicians were unable to retrieve the remnants, according to an FDA report.

The FDA said the company’s RotaWire Elite Guidewire and wireClip Torquer Guidewire are part of a system used to open narrowed arteries and improve blood flow to the heart, by cutting plaque from the artery wall.

There were 600 of the devices on the US market, the FDA said, and nearly 400 in other countries, in Europe, Japan, and South Africa, according to published reports. Keppeler said Boston Scientific alerted 30 US hospitals that had the devices.

He said the company’s standard Rotablator system, without the new components, is not being recalled.

The company has had other product problems in the past, including a major recall in 2010 of its implantable cardiac defibrillators. In 2004, Boston Scientific had recalls of its heart stents.

The firm had $1.9 billion in sales in the third quarter. Shares were little changed Friday, at $18.33; the news was released after the market’s close.

Kocarbon Ag Silver Carbon Wound Dressing consist of highly absorbent activated carbon fabric which actively adsorbs bacteria away from the wound bed.

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Best Botox Center In Warwick, Rhode Island and Fall River Massachusetts.

Best Botox Center In Warwick, Rhode Island and Fall River Massachusetts.

Agape Medical Spa Botox is a drug made from a toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. It’s the same toxin that causes a life-threatening type of food poisoning called botulism. Doctors use it in small doses to treat health problems, including

  • Temporary smoothing of facial wrinkles and improving your appearance
  • Severe underarm sweating
  • Cervical dystonia – a neurological disorder that causes severe neck and shoulder muscle contractions
  • Blepharospasm – uncontrollable blinking
  • Strabismus – misaligned eyes
  • Chronic migraine
  • Overactive bladder

Botox Provider In Rhode Island, Agape Medical Spa and Skin Care Center 400 Bald Hill Road Suite 506 Warwick, RI 02886

Botox injections work by weakening or paralyzing certain muscles or by blocking certain nerves. The effects last about three to twelve months, depending on what you are treating. The most common side effects are pain, swelling, or bruising at the injection site. You could also have flu-like symptoms, headache, and upset stomach. Injections in the face may also cause temporary drooping eyelids. You should not use Botox if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

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  • Botox (American Osteopathic College of Dermatology)
  • Botox Injections (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)

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Best Hydrafacial in Warwick Rhode Island and Fall River Massachusetts

What is Hydrafacial?

HydraFacial is the only hydradermabrasion procedure that combines cleansing, exfoliation, extraction, hydration and antioxidant protection simultaneously, resulting in clearer, more beautiful skin with no discomfort or downtime. The treatment is soothing, moisturizing, non-invasive and non-irritating.

Skin Health for Life™ is not just improving your appearance, but actually restoring youthful, healthy skin. Skin Health is a lifestyle, requiring monthly maintenance and the right treatment for every skin type. The treatment is the HydraFacial™ by Agape Medical Spa and Skin Care in Rhode Island.

The Best HydraFacial™ treatment in Warwick, Rhode Island merges soothing and invigorating spa therapies with advanced medical technology to achieve instant, lasting results.

Experience Vortex-Fusion

Each treatment uses a series of patented Best HydroPeel™ tips by Agape Medical Spa and Skin Care in Rhode Island and Massachusetts.  – each one has multiple abrasive edges to exfoliate the skin several times each pass, achieving better, more even results.

The unique spiral design creates a vortex effect to easily dislodge and remove impurities while simultaneously introducing hydrating skin solutions and potent antioxidants.